Episode seventeen: Judgment Free Zone

Episode Seventeen: Judgment Free Zone

In this episode, we talk about what we’re reading and whether or not we’re embarassed by our reading lists.

About the hosts

Discover more about Mary, Jackie and Caitlyn

Books mentioned

The Awkward Age by Francesca Segal
*Mary’s read

Julia Alden has fallen deeply, unexpectedly in love. American obstetrician James is everything she didn’t know she wanted–if only her teenage daughter, Gwen, didn’t hate him so much. Uniting two households is never easy, but when Gwen turns for comfort to James’s seventeen-year-old son, Nathan, the consequences will test her mother’s loyalty and threaten all their fragile new happiness.

 

 

Ugly Love by Colleen Hoover
*Jackie’s read

When Tate Collins meets airline pilot Miles Archer, she doesn’t think it’s love at first sight. They wouldn’t even go so far as to consider themselves friends. The only thing Tate and Miles have in common is an undeniable mutual attraction. Once their desires are out in the open, they realize they have the perfect set-up. He doesn’t want love, she doesn’t have time for love, so that just leaves the sex. Their arrangement could be surprisingly seamless, as long as Tate can stick to the only two rules Miles has for her. Never ask about the past. Don’t expect a future. They think they can handle it, but realize almost immediately they can’t handle it at all. Hearts get infiltrated. Promises get broken. Rules get shattered. Love gets ugly.

 

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt
*Caitlyn’s read

On the morning of August 4, 1892, Lizzie Borden calls out to the maid: Someone’s killed father. The brutal axe-murder of Andrew and Abby Borden in their house in Fall River, Massachusetts ignites a series of domestic nightmares. From the outside, no one can understand why anyone would want to murder the respected Bordens. From the inside, sisters Lizzie and Emma have a different tale to tell. Both unmarried and intimately bound together in a stifling environment, they each struggle against their oppressive home-life while longing for independence. As the police fail to find clues, Lizzie tries to make sense of the moments leading up to the discovery of the bodies. But there are other witnesses to the crime. Through the overlapping perspectives of Emma, the housemaid Bridget, the enigmatic stranger Benjamin, and the fascinating Lizzie herself, the ghosts of their pasts resurface and return to that fateful day. Shocking and riveting, Schmidt’s nuanced, high-wire narration recasts a sensational true story into a sensitive and human portrayal of a volatile, tortured family, and what it means to be free and truly loved.