Season 3: Episode 12: Be Prepared

Season Three: Episode Twelve: Be Prepared

In this episode, hosts Jackie, Leigh and Mary talk about their current reads and you should be prepared: “Miss Cecily’s Recipes for Exceptional Ladies” by Vicky Vimmerman, “Deacon King Kong” by James McBride, and “Audition” by Ryu Murakami.

About the hosts

Discover more about the show’s hosts.

Books mentioned

Miss Cecily’s Recipes for Exceptional Ladies by Vicky Vimmerman
*Jackie’s read

After a major life upheaval on the eve of her 40th birthday, Kate Parker finds herself volunteering at Lauderdale House for Exceptional Ladies. There she meets 97-year-old Cecily Finn. Cecily’s tongue is as sharp as her mind but she has lost her spark, simply resigning herself to the Imminent End. Having no patience with Kate’s plight, Cecily prescribes her a self-help book with a difference – it’s a 1957 cookbook, featuring menus for anything life can throw at “the easily dismayed.” So begins an unlikely friendship between two lonely and stubborn souls – one at the end of her life, one stuck in the middle – who discover one big life lesson: never be ashamed to ask for more.

Deacon King Kong by James McBride
*Leigh’s read

In September 1969, a fumbling, cranky old church deacon known as Sportcoat shuffles into the courtyard of the Cause Houses housing project in south Brooklyn, pulls a .45 from his pocket, and in front of everybody shoots the project’s drug dealer at point-blank range. The reasons for this desperate burst of violence and the consequences that spring from it lie at the heart of Deacon King Kong, James McBride’s funny, moving novel and his first since his National Book Award-winning The Good Lord Bird. In Deacon King Kong, McBride brings to vivid life the people affected by the shooting: the victim, the African-American and Latinx residents who witnessed it, the white neighbors, the local cops assigned to investigate, the members of the Five Ends Baptist Church where Sportcoat was deacon, the neighborhood’s Italian mobsters, and Sportcoat himself. As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters–caught in the tumultuous swirl of 1960s New York–overlap in unexpected ways. When the truth does emerge, McBride shows us that not all secrets are meant to be hidden, that the best way to grow is to face change without fear, and that the seeds of love lie in hope and compassion. Bringing to these pages both his masterly storytelling skills and his abiding faith in humanity, James McBride has written a novel every bit as involving as The Good Lord Bird and as emotionally honest as The Color of Water. Told with insight and wit, Deacon King Kong demonstrates that love and faith live in all of us.

Audition by Ryu Murakami
*Mary’s read

In this gloriously over-the-top tale, Aoyama, a widower who has lived alone with his son ever since his wife died seven years before, finally decides it is time to remarry. Since Aoyama is a bit rusty when it comes to dating, a filmmaker friend proposes that, in order to attract the perfect wife, they do a casting call for a movie they don’t intend to produce. As the resumes pile up, only one of the applicants catches Aoyama’s attention-Yamasaki Asami-a striking young former ballerina with a mysterious past. Blinded by his instant and total infatuation, Aoyama is too late in discovering that she is a far cry from the innocent young woman he imagines her to be. The novel’s fast-paced, thriller conclusion doesn’t spare the reader as Yamasaki takes off her angelic mask and reveals what lies beneath.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is sub-button-an-300x81.png
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is sub-button-300x81.png